Engineers, administrative and technical staff

Sébastien ACKET

Manager Analytical Platform

          Contact Sébastien Acket

 

Research

Member of the theme “Plant Metabolism and Bioresources”.

Understanding of lipid synthesis, regulation and accumulation mechanisms in oleaginous field crop cells and in reviviscent plants able to withstand extreme weather conditions.
Skills

Plant metabolism, lipidomics and non-target metabolomics, isotopic profiling, fluxomics (MFA, INST-MFA, FBA).
Roles and responsabilities

In charge of the Bioanalysis platform, UMR CNRS 7025.

Development of analytical methods in mass spectrometry for fluxomics, metabolomics and non-targeted lipidomics.

Member of the French network of metabolomics and fluxomics (http://www.rfmf.fr/).

Member of the network of lipidomysts (http://lipidomystes.gerli.com/reseau/).

 

General information

  • Since 2016: Engineer, UMR CNRS 7025 Génie enzymatique et Cellulaire, Compiègne.
  • 2015-2016: Engineer on the Metabolomic and Fluxomic Platform, UMR INRA 1332 Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, Villenave d’ornon.
  • 2011-2015: PhD “Involvement of carbon metabolism for differential oil production in oleaginous-linseed plants: modeling the systems” UMR CNRS 7025 Génie enzymatique et Cellulaire, Compiègne.

 

Personal interests

Badminton, music (Le dualo), gardening and organic farming, traveling.

 

 

Articles

Tshabuse F., Farrant J. M., Humbert L., Moura D., Rainteau D., Espinasse C., Idrissi A., Merlier F., Acket S., Rafudeen M. S., Thomasset B. & Ruelland E. Glycerolipid analysis during desication and recovery of the resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis (Bak) Dur and Schinz.. Plant Cell Environ.2018, 41,533-547.
     ABSTRACT: Feelings in humans are mental states representing groups of physiological functions that usually have defined behavioural purposes. Feelings, being evolutionarily ancient, are thought to be coordinated in the brain stem of animals. One function of the brain is to prioritise between competing mental states and, thus, groups of physiological functions and in turn behaviour. Plants use groups of coordinated physiological activities to deal with defined environmental situations but currently have no known mental state to prioritise any order of response. Plants do have a nervous system based on action potentials transmitted along phloem conduits but which in addition, through anastomoses and other cross?links, forms a complex network. The emergent potential for this excitable network to form a mental state is unknown, but it might be used to distinguish between different and even contradictory signals to the individual plant and thus determine a priority of response. This plant nervous system stretches throughout the whole plant providing the potential for assessment in all parts and commensurate with its self?organising, phenotypically plastic behaviour. Plasticity may, in turn, depend heavily on the instructive capabilities of local bioelectric fields enabling both a degree of behavioural independence but influenced by the condition of the whole plant.

Acket S., Degournay A., Merlier F. & Thomasset B. Data documenting the comparison between the theoretically expected values of free sugars mass isotopomer composition with standards using GC-MS and LC-HRMS for Metabolic Flux Analysis.. Data in Brief2017, 12,108-112.
     ABSTRACT: The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled

Pascal BOULNOIS

Informatics Correspondent - Maintenance

        Contact Pascal Boulnois

Virginie LAMBERTYN

Manager Analytical Platform - Safety Assistant UPJV/CNRS

         Contact Virginie Lambertyn

Morgane LUPPI

Secretary UTC - Finances

         Contact Morgane Luppi

 

 

Skills
Administrative and financial management
Roles and responsabilities

Secretary GEC, 3rd cycle, Master 2 Chemistry; assistance to the financial management of GEC unit

Financial management assistance of GEC unit:

  • registration and follow up of orders
  • suppliers relaunching
  • bills tracking
  • budget administration
  • assistance to the financial reporting of research projects

Secretary of GEC unit and M2:

  • welcoming of new entrants
  • administrative registration of new entrants
  • set up and follow up of all administrative procedures with UTC
  • management of schedules, shared agenda, holidays
  • mail management
  • entry of meeting minutes
  • organization and administrative registration of collaborative/meeting travels
  • expenses reports

 

General information

  • Since 2014: Secretary and management assistant – GEC Laboratory, University of Technology of Compiègne
  • 2012-2014: Brevet of senior technician, assistant of management of SME-SMI – Lycée Jean Calvin in Noyon – Laboratory GEC, University of Technology of Compiègne
  • 2009-2012: Bachelor’s degree, Secretary – Lycée Mireille Grenet in Compiègne

Franck MERLIER

Manager of Mass Spectrometry Platform

           Contact Franck Merlier

 

 

Research

  • Mass spectrometry
  • High-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF, Agilent 6538, GC-Qexactive Orbitrap) and low-resolution mass spectrometry in tandem (Thermo Quantum GC and Agilent 6460) coupled with chromatography (LC, GC, CE)
  • Chromatography
  • HPLC, uHPLC (Hilic, RP chromatography, SEC) with fluorescence, DEDL, UV, RI detection
  • Gas chromatography (HRMS, BRMS, Ms/MS, ECD and FID)
  • Capillary electrophoresis (UV and HRMS detection)
  • GPC/SEC (MALLS)

 

Skills

Lipidomics, small molecules, primary and secondary metabolites (amino acids, sugars, acyl-Coa, polyphenols, essential oils, …)
Roles and responsabilities

Manager of the mass spectrometry platform of the Enzymatic and Cell Engineering Laboratory.
General information

Franck MERLIER studied analytical chemistry at the University of Rennes 1, Jules Vernes University of Amiens and Marie Curie High School in Nogent/Oise. He holds a master’s degree in chemistry, specializing in “Spectroscopic methods of analysis”. He is in charge of the mass spectrometry platform of the Enzymatic and Cell Engineering Laboratory at Compiègne University of Technology.
 

Articles

Xu J., Merlier F., Avalle B., Veillard V., Debré P., Haupt K., Tse Sum Bui B. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles as Potential Synthetic Antibodies for Immunoprotection against HIV . ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2019, 11,9824-9831.
     ABSTRACT: We describe the preparation and characterization of synthetic antibodies based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP-NPs) for the recognition and binding of the highly conserved and specific peptide motif SWSNKS (3S), an epitope of the envelope glycoprotein 41 (gp41) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This motif is implicated in the decline of CD4+ T cells and leads to the deterioration of the immune system during HIV infection. Therefore, the development of MIP-NPs that can target and block the 3S peptide to prevent subsequent cascade interactions directed toward the killing of CD4+ T cells is of prime importance. Because most antibodies recognize their protein antigen via a conformational or structured epitope (as opposed to a linear epitope commonly used for molecular imprinting), we employed protein molecular modeling to design our template epitope so that it mimics the three-dimensional structure fold of 3S in gp41. The resulting template peptide corresponds to a cyclic structure composed of CGSWSNKSC, with the 3S motif well orientated for imprinting. MIP-NPs with a size of 65 nm were obtained by solid-phase synthesis and were water-soluble. They were prepared by a judicious combination of multiple functional monomers affording hydrogen bonding, ionic, π–π, and hydrophobic interactions, conferring high affinity and selectivity toward both the cyclic peptide and the whole gp41 protein. These results suggest that our MIPs could potentially be used for blocking the function of the 3S motif on the virus.

Tshabuse F., Farrant J. M., Humbert L., Moura D., Rainteau D., Espinasse C., Idrissi A., Merlier F., Acket S., Rafudeen M. S., Thomasset B. & Ruelland E. Glycerolipid analysis during desication and recovery of the resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis (Bak) Dur and Schinz.. Plant Cell Environ.2018, 41,533-547.
     ABSTRACT: Feelings in humans are mental states representing groups of physiological functions that usually have defined behavioural purposes. Feelings, being evolutionarily ancient, are thought to be coordinated in the brain stem of animals. One function of the brain is to prioritise between competing mental states and, thus, groups of physiological functions and in turn behaviour. Plants use groups of coordinated physiological activities to deal with defined environmental situations but currently have no known mental state to prioritise any order of response. Plants do have a nervous system based on action potentials transmitted along phloem conduits but which in addition, through anastomoses and other cross?links, forms a complex network. The emergent potential for this excitable network to form a mental state is unknown, but it might be used to distinguish between different and even contradictory signals to the individual plant and thus determine a priority of response. This plant nervous system stretches throughout the whole plant providing the potential for assessment in all parts and commensurate with its self?organising, phenotypically plastic behaviour. Plasticity may, in turn, depend heavily on the instructive capabilities of local bioelectric fields enabling both a degree of behavioural independence but influenced by the condition of the whole plant.

Merlier F., Jellali R., Leclerc E. Online monitoring of hepatic rat metabolism by coupling a liver biochip and a mass spectrometer. Analyst2017, 142,3747-3757.
     ABSTRACT: A microfluidic liver biochip was coupled with a mass spectrometer to detect in real time the drug metabolism of hepatocytes. The hepatocytes were cultivated in the biochip for 35 h. The biochip was placed in a small-scale incubator in which the temperature and CO2 concentration were controlled. The biochip was connected serially to a mass spectrometer, a peristaltic pump and a culture medium reservoir. The injection in the mass spectrometer was performed every 10 min for 11 h. The metabolism of midazolam, phenacetin, omeprazole, dextromethorphan, repaglinide, rosuvastatin, tolbutamide and caffeine was investigated. We monitored the apparition of omeprazole sulfone, hydroxy omeprazole, repaglinide glucuronide, rosuvastatin lactone, dextrorphan, 1-hydroxy midazolam, 4-hydroxy midazolam, 1,4-hydroxy midazolam, paracetamol and 1,3-methylxanthine. Although these were observed, hydroxytolbutamide, 3-methoxymorphinan and midazolam glucuronide, hydroxy repaglinide were not detected. Based on a pharmacokinetic model, we calculated in vitro intrinsic clearances in which adsorption onto the perfusion circuit was taken into account. Then, using a liver organ model, we extrapolated the in vitro intrinsic clearances to the in vivo clearances. The estimated in vivo clearances were in agreement with the literature data on rats for midazolam, dextromethorphan, phenacetin, tolbutamide and caffeine. Rosuvastatin, omeprazole and repaglinide prediction underestimated the in vivo data.

Acket S., Degournay A., Merlier F. & Thomasset B. Data documenting the comparison between the theoretically expected values of free sugars mass isotopomer composition with standards using GC-MS and LC-HRMS for Metabolic Flux Analysis.. Data in Brief2017, 12,108-112.
     ABSTRACT: The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled

Aimee Rasolohery C., Ermenegilde Ralaiba B., Ayerdi Gotor A., Merlier F., Benja R., Rakotovao M., Rhazi L. Chemical Characterization and Antioxidant Potential of Athroisma protei- formis Essential Oil. The Natural Products Journal2017, 7,208-215.
 

Nestora S., Merlier F., Prost E., Haupt K., Rossi C. & Tse Sum Bui B. Solid-phase extraction of betanin and isobetanin from beetroot extracts using a dipicolinic acid molecularly imprinted polymer.. J. Chromatogr. A2016, 1465,47-54.
 

Nestora S., Merlier F., Beyazit S., Prost E., Duma L., Baril B., Graves A., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Plastic antibodies for cosmetics: Molecularly imprinted polymers scavenge precursors of malodors. . Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2016, 55,6252-6256.
 

Jellali R., Bricks T., Jacques S., Fleury M. J., Paullier P., Merlier F. & Leclerc E. Long term human primary hepatocyte cultures in a microfluidic liver biochip show maintenance of mRNA levels and higher drugs metabolisms when compared to Petri cultures.. Biopharm. Drug Disp.2016, 37,264-275.
 

Bricks T., Hamon J., Fleury M. J., Jellali R., Merlier F., Herpe Y. E., Seyer A., Regimbeau J. M., Bois F. & Leclerc E. Investigation of omeprazole and phenacetin frist-pass metabolism in humans using a microscale bioreactor and pharmacokinetic models.. Biopharm. Drug Disp.2015, 36,275-293.
 

Nowacki L., Vigneron P., Rotellini L., Cazzola H., Merlier F., Prost E., Ralanairina R., Gadonna J. P., Rossi C. & Vayssade M. Betanin-enriched red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death in MCF-7 cells.. Phytother. Res.2015, 29,1964-1973.
 

Prot J. M., Maciel L., Bricks T., Merlier F., Cotton J., Paullier P., Bois F. & Leclerc E. First pass intestinal and liver metabolism of paracetamol in a microfluidic platform coupled with a mathematical modeling as a means of evaluating ADME processes in humans.. Biotechnol. Bioeng.2014, 111,2027-2040.
 

Bricks T., Paullier P., Legendre A., Fleury M. J., Zeller P., Merlier F., Anton P. M. & Leclerc E. Development of a new microfluidic platform integrating co-cultures of intestinal and liver cell lines.. Toxicol. In Vitro2014, 28,885-895.
 

Tanvir S., Merlier F. & Pulvin S. Biosensing of reactive intermediates produced by the photocatalytic activities of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.. J. Photochem. Photobiol. B2012, 110,22-27.
 

Rippa S., Zhao Y., Merlier F., Charrier A. & Perrin Y. The carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana shares similar features with the pathway of mamals and fungi.. Plant Physiol. Biochem.2012, 60,109-114.
 

Prot J. M., Briffaut A. S., Letourneur F., Chafey P., Merlier F., Grandvalet Y., Legallais C. & Leclerc E. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic investigation of the acetaminophen toxicity in liver microfluidic biochip.. PloS One2011, 6,e21268.
 

Tse Sum Bui B., Merlier F. & Haupt K. Towards the use of a molecularly imprinted polymer in doping analysis :selective preconcentration and analysis of testosterone and epitestosterone in human urine.. Anal. Chem.2010, 82,4420-4427.
 

Laëtitia NUNCQ

Secretary UPJV - Finances

Skills

  • Secretary: physical and telephone reception, mailing, meeting programming, reception of newcomers to the lab (various forms, rules of procedure …)
  • Management: orders registration (purchase order, …), inventory of supplies
    Assistance with budget management: SIFAC consultation, contacts with financial and research services
  • Travel processing: Online travel form request and reimbursement tracking for lab members in Amiens and of invited external members

 

Roles and responsabilities

Secretary of part of GEC laboratory located in Amiens, Jules Verne University
 

General information

  • June 1999: Certificate of Professional Secretary Studies
  • June 2001: Professional Bachelor of Secretary

 

Personal interests

Music, cinema

Stéphane OCTAVE

Innovation Correspondent - Member Steering Committee of "Science Festival" UTC

Research

I’m working at the interface between the theme “Plant Metabolism and Bioresources” and “Biomimicry and Biomolecular Recognition”.

My research focuses on the exploration and exploitation of molecular diversity to modulate plant metabolism. The goal is to provide tools to optimize plant productivity either by acting directly on the metabolic pathways of interest, or by helping plants to adapt themselves to biotic and abiotic stresses.

 

Skills

  • Management: scientific projects and programs
  • Valorization and transfert

 

Roles and responsabilities

  • Referent for Innovation (for INSB)
  • Member of the steering comity for « Fete de la Science » in UTC

 

General information

PhD in biology from the University of Poitiers (in 2005).

Work focused on the study of the eutypiosis of the vine along two axes: understand the dialogue between the plant and the pathogenic fungus on the one hand and on the other hand develop tools to fight against infection. This latter approach was based on the use of natural molecules (amino acids and derivatives) and the use of pathogenic effectors to develop an immunoassay detection tool.

Joined UTC as research engineer in 2006 in the Research Direction to assist researchers in their projects, from preparing call’s answer to the exploitation of results. Also involved in University’s programs, in particular in structuration and implementation of the ITE PIVERT.

Member of the laboratory since July 2017.

 

Main publications

Articles

Octave S., Fleurat-lessard P., Roblin G. Diagnosis of Eutypa lata infection by immunological detection in grapevine dying arm disease. Journal of plant Pathology2009, 91,321-300.
 

Octave S. &thomas D. Biorefinery: Toward an industrial metabolism.. Biochimie2009, 91,659-664.
 

Octave S., Fleurat-lessard P., Roblin G. Effects of non-glycosylated and glycosylated polypeptides secreted by the grapevine pathogen Eutypa lata on the structural features and membrane processes in grapevine cells . Journal of plant Pathology 2008, 90,221-224.
 

Octave S., Roblin G., Vachaud M., Fleurat-lessard P. Polypeptide metabolites secreted by the fungal pathogen Eutypa lata participate in Vitis vinifera L. to cell structure damage observed in Eutypa dieback . Functional Plant Biology 2006, 33 ,297-307 .
 

Octave S., Amborabe B. E., Fleurat-lessard P., Berges T., Roblin G. Modifications of plant cell activities by peptidic metabolites excreted by Eutypa lata, a vineyard fungal pathogen . Physiologia Plantarum 2006, 128 ,103-115 .
 

Rudelle J., Octave S., Kaid-arche M., Roblin G., Fleurat-lessard P.  Structural modifications induced by Eutypa lata in the xylem of trunk and canes of Vitis vinifera . Functional Plant Biology 2005, 32 ,537-547 .
 

Amborabe B. E., Octave S., Roblin G. Influence of temperature and nutritional requirements for mycelial growth of Eutypa lata, a vineyard pathogenic fungus . C.R. Biologies 2005, 328 ,263-270 .
 

Octave S., Amborabe B. E., Luini E., Ferreira T., Fleurat-lessard P., Roblin G. Antifungal effect of cysteine towards the fungus Eutypa lata . Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 2005, 43 ,1006-1013 .
 


Other publications

Octave S., Fleurat-Lessard P. and Roblin G. (2009) Diagnosis of Eutypa lata infection by immunological detection in grapevine dying arm disease. Journal of plant Pathology 91: 321-330. doi 10.4454/jpp.v91i2.961  

 

Octave S., Roblin G. and Fleurat-Lessard P. (2008) Effects of non-glycosylated and glycosylated polypeptides secreted by the grapevine pathogen Eutypa lata on the structural features and membrane processes in grapevine cells. Journal of Plant Pathology 90: 211-224. doi 10.4454/jpp.v90i2.656

 

Octave S., Amborabe B.E., Fleurat-Lessard P., Bergès T. and Roblin G. (2006) Modifications of plant cell activities by peptidic metabolites excreted by Eutypa lata, a vineyard fungal pathogen. Physiologia Plantarum 128: 103-115. doi 10.1111/j.1399-3054.2006.00715.x

 

Octave S., Roblin G., Vachaud M. and Fleurat-Lessard P. (2006) Polypeptide metabolites secreted by the fungal pathogen Eutypa lata participate in Vitis vinifera L. to cell structure damage observed in Eutypa dieback.  Functional Plant Biology 33: 297-307. doi 10.1071/FP05230

 

Octave S., Amborabe B.E., Luini E., Ferreira T., Fleurat-Lessard P. and Roblin G. (2005) Antifungal effect of cysteine towards the fungus Eutypa lata. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 43: 1006-1013. doi 10.1016/j.plaphy.2005.10.003

 

Amborabé B.E., Octave S. and Roblin G. (2005) Influence of temperature and nutritional requirements for mycelial growth of Eutypa lata, a vineyard pathogenic fungus. C.R. Biologies 328: 263-270. doi 10.1016/j.crvi.2005.01.006

 

Rudelle J., Octave S., Kaid-Harche M., Roblin G. and Fleurat-Lessard P. (2005) Structural modifications induced by Eutypa lata in the xylem of trunk and canes of Vitis vinifera. Functional Plant Biology 32: 537-547. doi 10.1071/FP05012

Elise PROST

Training Correspondent - Manager RMN/RAMAN/FTIR Platform

Research

Member of the theme “Biomimicry and Biomolecular Diversity”. I’m CNRS engineer in the Enzymatic and Cell Engineering (GEC) laboratory and collaborate directly with Luminita Duma (CR CNRS) within the MIP team. I’m involved in the various projects of the unit that require NMR, Raman or InfraRed skills.

 

Roles and responsabilities

  • In charge of the various devices: RMN Bruker Avance III 400, Raman Witec Alpha 300S and IR Thermo IS50
  • ITRF Jury Expert
  • Laboratory Training Correspondent
  • ITRF/ITA representative on the unit council

 

General information

I’m chemist specialized in NMR thanks to my degree in physicochemical analysis and an internship on the NMR of oligosaccharides. My experiences in different laboratories have confirmed this expertise. I am since 2013, assigned to the GEC unit, as a CNRS engineer in charge of NMR, Raman and InfraRed devices.

  • Since april 2013:IE CNRS – University of Technology of Compiègne. In charge of the plateforms NMR, Raman et IR
  • 2006 – 2013: IE CNRS – University Paris Descartes. In charge of the NMR magnets Bruker Avance 300 et 400, Organic structural analysis
  • 2001 – 2005: IE CNRS – University of Reims. In charge of the NMR magnets. NMR methods development / Organic structural analysis (NMR and molecular modeling) Training
  • 2000: Professional Master “Instrumentation and Physico-Chemical Methods of Analysis”, option: organic analysis, UFR Sciences – Orsay
  • 1999: Master “Organic Chemistry”, UFR Sciences – Orsay
  • 1998: “Maîtrise” degree in chemistry, option: “analytical techniques in molecular chemistry”, UFR Sciences – Dijon

 

Main Publications

Articles

Xu J., Prost E., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Direct and sensitive determination of trypsin in human urine using a water-soluble signaling fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer nanoprobe. . Sensor. Actuat. B-Chem. 2018, 258,10-17.
     ABSTRACT: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2017.11.077

Nestora S., Merlier F., Prost E., Haupt K., Rossi C. & Tse Sum Bui B. Solid-phase extraction of betanin and isobetanin from beetroot extracts using a dipicolinic acid molecularly imprinted polymer.. J. Chromatogr. A2016, 1465,47-54.
 

Panagiotopoulou M., Salinas Y., Beyazit S., Kunath S., Mayes A. G., Duma L., Prost E., Resmini M., Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Molecularly imprinted polymer-coated quantum dots for multiplexed cell targeting and imaging.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2016, 55,8244-8248.
 

Nestora S., Merlier F., Beyazit S., Prost E., Duma L., Baril B., Graves A., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Plastic antibodies for cosmetics: Molecularly imprinted polymers scavenge precursors of malodors. . Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2016, 55,6252-6256.
 

Nowacki L., Vigneron P., Rotellini L., Cazzola H., Merlier F., Prost E., Ralanairina R., Gadonna J. P., Rossi C. & Vayssade M. Betanin-enriched red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death in MCF-7 cells.. Phytother. Res.2015, 29,1964-1973.
 

Boultadakis-arapinis M., Gandon V., Prost E., Micouin L. & Lecourt T. Electronic effects in carbene-mediated C-H bond functionalization: an experimental and theoretical study.. Adv. Synth. Catal.2014, 356,2493-2505.
 

Sonia RIPPA

Competent Person in Radiation Protection - Manager of L2 & S2

Research

I am involved in the “Plant Metabolism and Bioresources” theme to study the carnitine biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis and get insights in the carnitine physiological roles in plants, especially in lipid metabolism and stress tolerance.

I collaborate with the “Biomimicry and Biomolecular Diversity” theme in a transversal approach to study interactions of natural amphiphilic compounds with biomimetic membranes and understand the mode of action of such molecules to trigger plant defenses or to inhibit phytopathogens. I study the physiological effects of the compounds, the defense pathways and mechanisms induced in plants (Arabidopsis, rapeseed) and microorganisms.

I lead a more applicative project aiming to optimize and validate the efficiency of rhamnolipids to protect rapeseed from pathogenic fungi in the field.

I look for new biocontrol agents or new biocontrol strategies.

 

Skills 

Scientific skills: Plant physiology, plant defense, plant stress tolerance, phytopathogens, antimicrobial control, biocontrol

Technical skills: Molecular biology, transcriptomic, biochemistry, plant mutants, microbiology, microscopy, mass spectrometry

 

Roles and responsabilities

  • Person Competent in Radiation protection (Nuclear Safety Authority correspondent)
  • Biosafety Level 2 Laboratories Manager (human cells, bacteria, plants)
  • GMO correspondent
  • Teaching: In charge of the Biocontrol BG08 UE (M2 degree, Master Chimie, parcours biotechnologie UTC UPJV)

 

General information

My first academic research experience took place in 1998 in the Plant Science Institute (CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette). I got molecular biology skills in the Dr A. Kondorosi’s laboratory, with Dr P. Ratet in a Medicago truncatula T-DNA tagging project. I then joined the group of Dr J. Giraudat to work with Dr F. Parcy to study the fine-tuning gene expression process during late embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In 2001, I got an Engineer position in the University of Technology of Compiègne in the Enzyme and Cell Engineering Unit. In 2003, I started a PhD to study the interaction and the defense mechanisms induced by peptaibols (amphiphilic peptides mainly produced by Trichoderma fungi) on the plant Arabidopsis. In 2007, I got involved in a project aiming to study the carnitine role in plants. This project was initiated by Pr Y. Perrin in the PMB theme. I more precisely studied the carnitine biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis to identify enzymes involved in carnitine synthesis and to study mutants of these enzymes. Since 2014, as a Research Engineer, I have initiated a project with Pr C. Sarazin, to study the mode of perception/action of natural amphiphilic glycolipids by plants or against phytopathogens.

 

Personal interests

Reading, travelling, French gastronomy…

 

Main publications

Articles

Monnier N., Furlan A-l., Buchoux S., Deleu M., Dauchez M., Rippa S., Sarazin C. Exploring the Dual Interaction of Natural Rhamnolipids with Plant and Fungal Biomimetic Plasma Membranes through Biophysical Studies" has been published in IJMS as part of the Special Issue SAR "Out of the Box. Int. J. Mol. Sci.2019, 20,1009.
 

Monnier M., Furlan A., Botcazon C., Dahi A., Mongelard G., Cordelier S., Clement C., Dorey S., Sarazin C., Rippa S. Rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elicitors triggering Brassica napus protection against Botrytis cinerea without physiological disorders. Frontiers in Plant Science2018, 1778,101-124.
     ABSTRACT: Rhamnolipids (RLs) are amphiphilic molecules naturally produced by some bacteria with a large range of biological activities. Although some studies report their potential interest in plant protection, evaluation of their effects and efficiency on annual crops of worldwide agronomic interest is lacking. The main objective of this work was to investigate their elicitor and protective activities on rapeseed crop species while evaluating their physiological effects. Here we report that RLs from Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretome trigger an effective protection of Brassica napus foliar tissues toward the fungus Botrytis cinerea involving the combination of plant defense activation and direct antimicrobial properties. We demonstrated their ability to activate canonical B. napus defense responses including reactive oxygen species production, expression of defense genes, along with callose deposits and stomatal closure as efficient physical protections. In addition, microscopic cell death observations and electrolyte leakage measurements indicated that RLs trigger a hypersensitive response-like defense in this plant. We also showed that foliar spray applications of RLs do not induce deleterious physiological consequences on plant growth or chlorophyll content and that RL protective properties are efficient on several grown cultivars of rapeseed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RLs as an elicitor that suppresses fungal disease on tissues of an annual crop species under greenhouse conditions. Our results highlight the dual mode of action of these molecules exhibiting plant protection activation and antifungal activities and demonstrate their potential for crop cultures as environmental-friendly biocontrol solution.

Jacques F., Rippa S., Perrin Y. Physiology of L-carnitine in plants in light of the knowledge in animals and microorganisms. Plant Science2018, 9,1170.
     ABSTRACT: L-carnitine is present in all living kingdoms where it acts in diverse physiological processes. It is involved in lipid metabolism in animals and yeasts, notably as an essential cofactor of fatty acid intracellular trafficking. Its physiological significance is poorly understood in plants, but L-carnitine may be linked to fatty acid metabolism among other roles. Indeed, carnitine transferases activities and acylcarnitines are measured in plant tissues. Current knowledge of fatty acid trafficking in plants rules out acylcarnitines as intermediates of the peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, unlike in animals and yeasts. Instead, acylcarnitines could be involved in plastidial exportation of de novo fatty acid, or importation of fatty acids into the ER, for synthesis of specific glycerolipids. L-carnitine also contributes to cellular maintenance though antioxidant and osmolyte properties in animals and microbes. Recent data indicate similar features in plants, together with modulation of signaling pathways. The biosynthesis of L-carnitine in the plant cell shares similar precursors as in the animal and yeast cells. The elucidation of the biosynthesis pathway of L-carnitine, and the identification of the enzymes involved, is today essential to progress further in the comprehension of its biological significance in plants.

Nguyen P. J., Rippa S., Rossez Y. & Perriny. Acylcarnitines participate in developmental processes associated to lipid metabolism in plants.. Planta2016, 243,1011-1022.
 

Rippa S., Zhao Y., Merlier F., Charrier A. & Perrin Y. The carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana shares similar features with the pathway of mamals and fungi.. Plant Physiol. Biochem.2012, 60,109-114.
 

Charrier A., Rippa S., Yu A., Nguyen P. J., Renou J. P. & Perrin Y. The effect of carnitine on Arabidopsis development and recovery in salt stress conditions.. Planta2012, 235,123-135.
 

Rippa S., Eid M., Formaggio F., Toniolo C & Beven L. Hypersensitive-like response to the pore-former peptaibol alamethicin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Chembiochem2010, 11,2042-2049.
 

Eid M., Rippa S., Castano S., Desbat B., Chopineau J. Rossi C. & Beven L. Exploring the membrane mechanism of the bioactive peptaibol ampullosporin A using lipid monolayers and supported biomimetic membranes. J. Biophys.2010, 2010,Art.ID 179641.
 

Rippa S, Adenier H, Derbaly M. And Beven L. The peptaibol alamethicin induces an rRNA-cleavage-associated death in Arabidopsis thaliana.. Chem. Biodivers.2007, 4,1360-1373.
 

Valérie SANTONI

Logistics - Management Chemical Products Database

Research

Involved in research projects of the theme “Plant Metabolism and Bioresources”, namely with Sonia Rippa on “Inhibiting effect of compounds of mycelial growth of phytopathogenic fungi” and Yolande Perrin on “Biotechnology of microalgae”.

 
Skills

Plant cultures, DNA extraction, microbiological and biological assays. Financial management and collective logistics. SIFAC / CNRS

Valérie ROBQUIN

Logistics - Management Chemical Products Database

Research

Involved in research projects of the theme “Plant Metabolism and Bioresources” and, in particular, the transverse project “study of the interaction of bacterial flagella and biotic and abiotic surfaces” with Yannick Rossez.
 

Skills

Plant cultures, extraction of molecules, biological and microbiological assays. Financial management and collective logistics. SIFAC / CNRS
 

Roles and responsabilities

Technician in Biology. Order forms registration in SIFAC software as well as monitoring and distribution of biological and chemical product ordered. Unit consumables management (bunker, alcohols, laboratory consumables, office supplies). Registration of product entries and exits in the laboratory’s products database (GPUC). Tracking orders and relaunching suppliers in case of delay or undelivery.
 

General information

  • 1989: Preparator in Pharmacy BP obtained
  • Since 11/1989: Technician in GEC unit
  • Treasurer of L’Amicale of UTC

 

Personal interests
Cooking, decoration

Carol SCHEMBRI

Administration, Finances, Communication - Safety Assistant UTC/CNRS

Skills

  • Research projects: budget preparation and monitoring, financial management, financial and administrative reporting
  • Implementation and control of management procedures
  • Recruitment and personnel management
  • Risk Management, Training Students and Newcomers

 

Roles and responsabilities

  • Administrative manager of the Enzymatic and Cell Engineering unit, UMR 7025 CNRS
  • Correspondent Human Resources
  • Correspondent Communication
  • Trained in Safety techniques
  • Member of the Technical Committee at UTC
  • Member of CHSCT at UTC

 

General information

Since 2014: Administrative manager of the Enzymatic and Cell Engineering unit, UMR 7025 CNRS
In charge of the administrative management of the UMR, which is under three trusteeship (CNRS / UTC / UPJV), namely: Finances Human resources Communication

Since 2012: CNRS/UTC safety assistant of the UMR7025 and, in particular, in charge of the prevention of risks (biological, chemical, etc.) and the training of students and new entrants in terms of risks and safety procedures.

Main publications

Articles

Hodrogue A., Trecherel E., Cornu M., Darwiche W., Mansour A., Ait-mohand K., Verissimo T., Gomila C., Schembri C., Da Nascimento S., Elboutachfait R., Boulier A., Lorne E., Courtois J., Petit E., Toumieux S., Kovensky J., Sonnet P., Massy Z. A., Kamel S. Rossi C., Ausseil J. Oligogalacturonic acid inhibits vascular calcification by two mechanisms: inhibition of VSMC osteogenic conversion and interaction with collagen. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology2017, 37,1391-1401.
 

Cutivet A., Schembri C., Kovensky J. & Haupt K. Molecularly imprinted microgels as enzyme inhibitors.. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131,14699-14702.
 

Bernadette TSE SUM BUI

Research

Member of the theme “Biomimicry and Biomolecular Diversity”.

Development of Molecular Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) and composite materials based on MIP for bioanalysis (separation, solid-phase extraction), biosensors, cellular bioimaging, controlled release of drugs, immunoassays (fluorescence, radioactivity, colorimetry) and enzyme inhibitors, odor and air pollutants suppresors. The developed MIPs target endocrine disruptors, antibiotics, mycotoxins, hormones, drugs, pesticides, nucleotides, amino acids, biogenic amines, cancer biomarkers (glycans, proteins, …) and they can be applied in domains such as nanomedicine, environment, agri-food, doping, cosmetology, biotechnology, …

 

General information

  • 2018: Member of the Action COST “Innovation with Glycans: new frontiers from synthesis to new biological targets” (INNOGLY)
  • 2018: Member of the association Healthcare & Biological Sciences Research Association (HBSRA)
  • 2017: CNRS crystal medal
  • 2017: Member of the organization committee of the international congress ‘Affinity 2017, 22nd Biennal Meeting of International Society for Molecular Recognition’, Paris
  • 2013: Member of the  organization committee ‘2nd NANODRUG meeting and summer school’, Biarritz
  • 2012: Prix Collegium UTC-CNRS-INSIS
  • 2012: Member of the organization committee of the 7th international congress ‘MIP 2012, Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Science and Technology’, Paris

Degrees

  • 1991: PhD in biotechnology, UTC
  • 2001: HDR en biotechnology, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), Paris

Profesionnal experience

  • 1993: Post-doc, Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Biologique, UPMC
  • 1997: CNRS research engineer, UPMC
  • 2006: CNRS research engineer, UTC

Supervision

3 post-docs, 13 PhDs, 3 masters
Bin Li: Molecularly imprinted polymers for applications in cosmetology (2013).
Xuan-Anh Ton: Fiber optic chemical sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers for the detection of mycotoxins (2013).
Selim Beyazit: Functional nanoparticles for biomedical applications (2014).
Jacqueline Maximilien: Studies of the impact of core-shell polystyrene nanoparticles on cell membranes and biomimetic models (2015).
Maria Panagiotopoulou: Organic-inorganic composite materials for specific recognition and optical detection of environmental, food and biomedical analytes (2016).
Sofia Nestora: Molecularly imprinted polymers as selective sorbents for recognition in complex aqueous samples (2017).
Jingjing Xu: Solid-phase synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for protein recognition (2017).
Paulina Rangel: Molecularly imprinted nanostructures for cell differentiation.
Alejandra Mier:  Molecularly imprinted polymer nanocomposites for cancer cell recognition and cell imaging.

 
Main publications

Articles

Medina Rangel P., Caclef S., Xu J., Panagiotopoulou M., Kovensky J., Tse Sum Bui B., Haupt K. Solid-phase synthesis of moleculary imprinted polymer nanolabels: Affinity tools for cellular bioimaging of glycans. Scientific Reports2019, 9,3923.
 

Xu J., Merlier F., Avalle B., Veillard V., Debré P., Haupt K., Tse Sum Bui B. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles as Potential Synthetic Antibodies for Immunoprotection against HIV . ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2019, 11,9824-9831.
     ABSTRACT: We describe the preparation and characterization of synthetic antibodies based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP-NPs) for the recognition and binding of the highly conserved and specific peptide motif SWSNKS (3S), an epitope of the envelope glycoprotein 41 (gp41) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This motif is implicated in the decline of CD4+ T cells and leads to the deterioration of the immune system during HIV infection. Therefore, the development of MIP-NPs that can target and block the 3S peptide to prevent subsequent cascade interactions directed toward the killing of CD4+ T cells is of prime importance. Because most antibodies recognize their protein antigen via a conformational or structured epitope (as opposed to a linear epitope commonly used for molecular imprinting), we employed protein molecular modeling to design our template epitope so that it mimics the three-dimensional structure fold of 3S in gp41. The resulting template peptide corresponds to a cyclic structure composed of CGSWSNKSC, with the 3S motif well orientated for imprinting. MIP-NPs with a size of 65 nm were obtained by solid-phase synthesis and were water-soluble. They were prepared by a judicious combination of multiple functional monomers affording hydrogen bonding, ionic, π–π, and hydrophobic interactions, conferring high affinity and selectivity toward both the cyclic peptide and the whole gp41 protein. These results suggest that our MIPs could potentially be used for blocking the function of the 3S motif on the virus.

Xu J., Prost E., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Direct and sensitive determination of trypsin in human urine using a water-soluble signaling fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer nanoprobe. . Sensor. Actuat. B-Chem. 2018, 258,10-17.
     ABSTRACT: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2017.11.077

Xu J, Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles as synthetic antibodies in a sandwich fluoroimmunoassay for trypsin determination in human serum.. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2017, 9, 24476?24483.
     ABSTRACT: We describe the application of a fluorescently labeled water-soluble core

Panagiotopoulou M., Kunath S., Medina-rangel P. X., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers as plastic antibodies for selective labeling and imaging of hyaluronan and sialic acid on fixed and living cells.. Biosens. Bioelectron.2017, 88,85-93.
     ABSTRACT: Altered glycosylation levels or distribution of sialic acids (SA) or hyaluronan in animal cells are indicators of pathological conditions like infection or malignancy. We applied fluorescently-labeled molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) particles for bioimaging of fixed and living human keratinocytes, to localize hyaluronan and sialylation sites. MIPs were prepared with the templates D-glucuronic acid (GlcA), a substructure of hyaluronan, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), the most common member of SA. Both MIPs were found to be highly selective towards their target monosaccharides, as no cross-reactivity was observed with other sugars like N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-glucose and D-galactose, present on the cell surface. The dye rhodamine and two InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) emitting in the green and in the red regions were used as fluorescent probes. Rhodamine-MIPGlcA and rhodamine-MIPNANA were synthesized as monodispersed 400 nm sized particles and were found to bind selectively their targets located in the extracellular region, as imaged by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. In contrast, when MIP-GlcA and MIP-NANA particles with a smaller size (125 nm) were used, the MIPs being synthesized as thin shells around green and red emitting QDs respectively, it was possible to stain the intracellular and pericellular regions as well. In addition, simultaneous dual-color imaging with the two different colored QDs-MIPs was demonstrated. Importantly, the MIPs were not cytotoxic and did not affect cell viability; neither was the cells morphology affected as demonstrated by live cell imaging. These synthetic receptors could offer a new and promising imaging tool to monitor disease progression.

Nestora S., Merlier F., Prost E., Haupt K., Rossi C. & Tse Sum Bui B. Solid-phase extraction of betanin and isobetanin from beetroot extracts using a dipicolinic acid molecularly imprinted polymer.. J. Chromatogr. A2016, 1465,47-54.
 

Chia Gomez L. P., Spangenberg A., Ton X. A., Fuchs Y., Bokeloh F., Malval J. P., Tse Sum Bui B., Thuau D., Ayela C., Haupt K. & Soppera O. Rapid prototyping of chemical microsensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by two-photon stereolithography.. Adv. Mater.2016, 28,5931-5937.
 

Parlak O., Beyazit S., Jafari M. J., Tse Sum Bui B., Haupt K., Tiwari A. & Turner A. P. F. Light-triggered switchable graphene-polymer hybrid bioelectronics.. Adv. Mater. Interfaces2016, 3,1500353.
 

Panagiotopoulou M., Salinas Y., Beyazit S., Kunath S., Mayes A. G., Duma L., Prost E., Resmini M., Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Molecularly imprinted polymer-coated quantum dots for multiplexed cell targeting and imaging.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2016, 55,8244-8248.
 

Nestora S., Merlier F., Beyazit S., Prost E., Duma L., Baril B., Graves A., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Plastic antibodies for cosmetics: Molecularly imprinted polymers scavenge precursors of malodors. . Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2016, 55,6252-6256.
 

Xu J. J., Ambrosini S., Tamahkar E., Rossi C., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Toward a universal method for preparing molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for proteins.. Biomacromolecules2016, 17,345-353.
 

Parlak O., Beyazit S., Tse Sum Bui B., Haupt K., Turner A. P. F. & Tiwari A. Programmable bioelectronics in a stimuli-encoded 3D graphene interface.. Nanoscale2016, 8,9976-9981.
 

Beyazit S., Tse Sum Bui B., Haupt K. & Gonzato C. Molecularly imprinted polymer nanomaterials and nanocomposites by controlled/living radical polymerization.. Prog. Polym. Sci.2016, 62,1-21.
 

Adali-kaya Z., Tse Sum Bui B., Falcimaigne-cordin A. & Haupt K. Molecularly imprinted polymer nanomaterials and nanocomposites: atom-transfer radical polymerization with acidic monomers.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2015, 54,192-195.
 

Ton X. A., Acha V., Bonomi P., Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. A disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective fluorescent probe.. Biosens. Bioelectron.2015, 64,359-366.
 

Panagiotopoulou M., Beyazit S., Nestora S., Haupt K., & Tse Sum Bui B. Initiator-free synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers by polymerization of self-initiated monomers.. Polymer2015, 66,43-51.
 

Foguel M. V., Ton X. A., Zanoni M. V. B., Sotomayor M. D. P. T., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. A molecularly imprinted polymer-based evanescent wave fiber optic sensor for the detection of basic red 9 dye. . Sens. Actuators B2015, 218,222-228.
 

Beyazit S., Ambrosini S., Marchyk N., Palo E., Kale V., Soukka T., Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Versatile synthetic strategy for coating upconverting nanoparticles with polymer shells through localized photopolymerization by using the particles as internal light sources.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2014, 53,8919-8923.
 

Li B., Xu J., Hall A. J., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Water-compatible silica sol-gel molecularly imprinted polymer as potential delivery system for the controlled release of salicylic acid.. J. Mol. Recognit.2014, 27,559-565.
 

Marchyk N., Maximilien J., Beyazit S., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. One-pot synthesis of iniferter-bound polystyrene core nanoparticles for the controlled grafting of multilayer shells.. Nanoscale2014, 6,2872-2878.
 

Cakir P., Cutivet A., Resmini M., Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Protein-size molecularly imprinted polymer nanogels as synthetic antibodies, by localized polymerization with multi-initiators.. Adv. Mater.2013, 25,1048-1051.
 

Ton X. A., Tse Sum Bui B., Resmini M., Bonomi P., Dika I., Soppera O. & Haupt K. A versatile fiber-optic fluorescence sensor based on molecularly imprinted microstructures polymerized in situ.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.2013, 52,8317-8321.
 

Ambrosini S., Beyazit S., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Solid-phase synthesis of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for protein recognition.. Chem. Commun.2013, 49,6746-6748.
 

Ton X. A., Acha V., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Direct fluorimetric sensing of UV-excited analytes in biological and environmental samples using molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles and fluorescence polarization.. Biosens. Bioelectron.2012, 36,22-28.
 

Haupt K., Linares A. V., Bompart M. & Tse Sum Bui B. Molecularly imprinted polymers.. Top. Curr. Chem.2012, 325,1-28.
 

Harz S., Shimmelpfennig M., Tse Sum Bui B., Marchyk N., Haupt K. & Feller K. H. Fluorescence optical spectrally resolved sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers and microfluidics.. Eng. Life Sci.2011, 11,559-565.
 

Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Preparation and evaluation of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of testosterone – application to molecularly imprinted sorbent assays.. J. Mol. Recognit.2011, 24,1123-1129.
 

Piperno S., Tse Sum Bui B., Haupt K. & Ghebert L. A. Immobilization of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles in electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers.. Langmuir2011, 27,1547-1550.
 

Tse Sum Bui B. & Haupt K. Molecularly imprinted polymers : synthetic receptors in bioanalysis. Anal. Bioanal. Chem.2010, 398,2481-2492.
 

Tse Sum Bui B., Merlier F. & Haupt K. Towards the use of a molecularly imprinted polymer in doping analysis :selective preconcentration and analysis of testosterone and epitestosterone in human urine.. Anal. Chem.2010, 82,4420-4427.
 

Lotierzo M., Tse Sum Bui B., Leech H. K., Warren M. J., Marquet A. & Rigby S. E. J. Iron-sulfur cluster dynamics in biotin synthase: A new [2Fe-2S]1+ cluster.. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2009, 381,487-490.
 

Mhaka B., Cukrowska E., Tse Sum Bui B., Ramstrom O., Haupt K., Tutu H. & Chimuka L. Selective extraction of triazine herbicide from food samples based on a combination of a liquid membrane and molecularly imprinted polymers.. J. Chromatogr. A2009, 1216,6796-6801.
 

Tse Sum Bui B., Belmont A. S., Witters H. & Haupt K. Molecular recognition of endocrine disruptors by synthetic and natural 17beta-estradiol receptors: a comparative study.. Anal. Bioanal. Chem.2008, 390,2081-2088.
 

BOOK

Xu J, Medina-rangel P. X., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B. Guide to the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for protein recognition, by solid-phase synthesis. Methods Enzymol2017, ,pp.115-141
  

Panagiotopoulou M., Kunath S., Haupt K., Tse Sum Bui B. Cell and Tissue Imaging with Molecularly Imprinted Polymers . Methods in Molecular Biology2017, ,PP.399-415
  

Maximilien J., Beyazit S., Rossi C., Haupt K. & Tse Sum Bui B Nanoparticles in biomedical applications. Measuring Biological impacts of nanomaterials2016, Springer International Publishing, Switzerland,pp. 177-210